Legit Methods for Personalizing PLR to Make Blog Posts

Hey, friend. If you publish private label rights content in your blog, then you'll want to get some techniques under your belt for making that content your own. To do this, you can write the entire article (or set of them) if you want to. But, that takes time, and we're looking to save time. So I'm going to take a free article from the FREE PLR area of our website, and demonstrate how to quickly edit a how-to article to become a "personal blog post".

Keep in mind, if all that you publish is how-to articles anyway, then this method may not be necessary for you to use. But many bloggers brand using their real face and actual stories from their life. If that's how you blog, it can feel a little strange and impersonal to suddenly publish a generic how-to article that contains none of your personal flavor. So let's work on changing that.

Below I've pasted an article from the Home and Family PLR page on Wordfeeder. If you haven't downloaded your copy yet, grab it here. I'm going to paste the article here twice. Once in its original form, and a second time with edits shown in italics. For this exercise, I'll pretend I'm a home and family blogger and make up some facts about my own life, to insert throughout this piece.

ORIGINAL DRAFT of PLR CONTENT:

Rapid-Fire Solutions for Streamlining Your Family's Morning Routine


Do you dread the busy mornings, when everyone trips over each other in the kitchen and bathroom and it's an ongoing struggle to get coffee made, kids dressed and fed, and grown-ups showered and packed up in time for work? Are backpacks often misplaced, busses missed, and people generally annoyed and disheveled?


Instead of stressing about the mad morning rush, focus on how you can get things to run more smoothly by becoming more organized in the first place.


Tackle the week's lunch plans ahead of time. Most every kid enjoys pizza Fridays in the school cafeteria. Unless you're dealing with food allergies, you can plan for your children to buy lunch at the end of each week. Then, Monday can be another bought-lunch day, with kids eating school lunches while you're out at the grocery store, stocking up for brown-bagged lunches on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.


Check the weather. Nothing like dressing your kids in long pants in time to realize that rain is about to start pummeling everything just as they're heading out the door… or seeing them emerge from their rooms dressed in shorts on an unexpectedly chilly September morning. Take a minute to look at the weekly forecast. Then, check again the night before. Weather tends to be unpredictable, especially these days.


Organize the porch, hall closet, laundry room, mud room, or whatever space you have, with the appropriate seasonal outerwear. This way, kids can find jackets, don hats and gloves, stuff feet into boots, grab umbrellas, and be out the door ready to face whatever the elements may bring. Same goes for adults. Nothing like not being able to locate your own shoes when you've been hollering at the kids to "hurry up and let's go" for the last ten minutes!


Keep up with laundry. Procrastinating the washing of clothes leaves everyone feeling disorganized and chaotic in the morning. Laundry is one of those background tasks. If you're going to be home, you can easily throw in a load no matter what else you may be doing. Enlist older kids for laundry duty as well. It helps to categorize clothing, not only by color but by wearer. This way, the folder of the laundry can fill up baskets quickly without trying to figure out whose socks belong to whom.


If you must take shortcuts, make them productive ones. Since we're discussing laundry… suppose you just cleaned and dried some but now you don't have time to fold it. A time-saving shortcut would be to at least carry the basket of clean clothing up to the person's room whose laundry it is. This way, in the morning if they're missing a favorite pair of jeans, you can direct them to the basket of clothes.


Lay out kids' clothing the night before. If you're not sure what the weather will do, include two options such as shorts and pants. Lots of little ones prefer to dress themselves. This is fine, as long as your child is able to select a top and bottom that somewhat resembles what you would choose for them in terms of seasonal appropriateness and casual versus formal. For example, if today's occasion calls for a polo, then your child should understand that he or she can choose a different one -- but that a tee shirt may not be dressed-up enough.


Make and pack lunches at night. Sometimes the last thing you want to do is start filling lunch boxes at 8 p.m. But if you make lunch prep part of dinner clean-up, you can organize everything so that you're not awake at midnight worrying if you have enough cold cuts for everyone in the house to have lunch tomorrow.


Take shifts for the bathroom. If you're short on bathrooms, the best way around this is to stagger wake-up times. For a smaller sized family, adults can awaken, use the toilet and shower first. Kids follow suit while Mom or Dad is downstairs making breakfast. So set the alarms accordingly. Bigger families should allow for the kids with the earliest schedules to use the bathroom first. Also, things like hair drying and make-up application for teen girls needn't happen in the bathroom, especially when others are waiting their turn.


Schedule after-school activities, and stick to the plan. Even if your kids are smaller and they don't do extra-curriculars yet… afternoons should be planned for a bit of relaxation, a bit of play, homework hours, and time to review what's come home in the school folder. Missing this last step often results in a disorganized frenzy in the morning, with notes that need reading, permission slips and forms to sign, and general confusion.


Everyone knows that today's busy family has their share of challenges to keep up with, especially in the morning. But if you make that extra effort to be organized, you'll find that there are less tears and more smiles, which makes a great start to everyone's day.


EDITED WITH PERSONAL TOUCHES ADDED IN:
ORIGINAL TITLE:
Rapid-Fire Solutions for Streamlining Your Family's Morning Routine

EDITED TITLE:
No More Stressful Starts: My Best Tips for Making the Morning Routine Seamless


PARAGRAPH 1, ORIGINAL:
Do you dread the busy mornings, when everyone trips over each other in the kitchen and bathroom and it's an ongoing struggle to get coffee made, kids dressed and fed, and grown-ups showered and packed up in time for work? Are backpacks often misplaced, busses missed, and people generally annoyed and disheveled?


PARAGRAPH 1, EDITED:
Hey, my busy mamas! Are you like me, loathing the morning routine and all the stress it brings? Does the thought of misplaced sneakers, grumblings over cereal preferences, hastily packed lunches and a frantic scramble to get on the bus or in the car bring you down?

NOTE: In paragraph 1, I shifted the writing perspective to "I and me" in a few spots so that reader becomes aware of a human behind the thoughts.

PARAGRAPH 2, ORIGINAL:

Instead of stressing about the mad morning rush, focus on how you can get things to run more smoothly by becoming more organized in the first place.

PARAGRAPH 2, EDITED:

Recently, I made a few changes in my life to mitigate the ongoing struggle to get the kids off to school and my husband and me off to work on time. It all starts with a mindset shift. Instead of stressing about the mad morning rush, focus on how you can get things to run more smoothly by becoming more organized in the first place.

PARAGRAPH 3, ORIGINAL:

Tackle the week's lunch plans ahead of time. Most every kid enjoys pizza Fridays in the school cafeteria. Unless you're dealing with food allergies, you can plan for your children to buy lunch at the end of each week. Then, Monday can be another bought-lunch day, with kids eating school lunches while you're out at the grocery store, stocking up for brown-bagged lunches on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.

PARAGRAPH 3, EDITED:

Plan the family's lunches a week in advance. My kids live for pizza Fridays in the school cafeteria, and maybe yours do as well. (If allergies are an issue, maybe it's another day when your child will be buying lunch, but you know what I'm getting at here). So whatever day that is, it's one lunch that you don't have to shop for or prepare. The other day when your kids can buy lunch is Monday. Because honestly, who's running out to buy lunch meats on a Sunday? Not me! So now, we realize that we are really only shopping or prepping for 3 of the 5 school lunch days - really not too overwhelming at all!

(Notice again that I've injected some personal details here as well as used "I and we" throughout so the reader feels like the blogger is sharing with them personally.)

PARAGRAPH 4, ORIGINAL:

Check the weather. Nothing like dressing your kids in long pants in time to realize that rain is about to start pummeling everything just as they're heading out the door… or seeing them emerge from their rooms dressed in shorts on an unexpectedly chilly September morning. Take a minute to look at the weekly forecast. Then, check again the night before. Weather tends to be unpredictable, especially these days.

PARAGRAPH 4, EDITED:

Stay on top of the weather forecast. One of the last things I do before shutting it down for the night is check the weather for the next day. Then I check it again as soon as I wake up. Smart phones make this a no-brainer; just click your weather app. Lay out school and work outfits accordingly, gather any jackets or outerwear, and you can shave off considerable wasted morning hours scurrying around in confusion. This way you can avoid scenarios where it starts pouring just as they're heading out the door… or like when my kids come downstairs wearing shorts on an unexpectedly chilly September morning.

PARAGRAPH 5, ORIGINAL:

Organize the porch, hall closet, laundry room, mud room, or whatever space you have, with the appropriate seasonal outerwear. This way, kids can find jackets, don hats and gloves, stuff feet into boots, grab umbrellas, and be out the door ready to face whatever the elements may bring. Same goes for adults. Nothing like not being able to locate your own shoes when you've been hollering at the kids to "hurry up and let's go" for the last ten minutes!

PARAGRAPH 5, EDITED:

Catch up with the changing seasons. Organize the porch, hall closet, laundry room, mud room, or whatever space you have, with the appropriate seasonal outerwear. This way, kids can find jackets, don hats and gloves, stuff feet into boots, grab umbrellas, and be out the door ready to face whatever the elements may bring. Same goes for adults. More than once I've been guilty of being unable to locate my own hat or shoes after scolding my kids for the very same offense!

PARAGRAPH 6, ORIGINAL:

Keep up with laundry. Procrastinating the washing of clothes leaves everyone feeling disorganized and chaotic in the morning. Laundry is one of those background tasks. If you're going to be home, you can easily throw in a load no matter what else you may be doing. Enlist older kids for laundry duty as well. It helps to categorize clothing, not only by color but by wearer. This way, the folder of the laundry can fill up baskets quickly without trying to figure out whose socks belong to whom.

PARAGRAPH 6, EDITED:

Keep laundry going in the background. It's really the task that never ends, and should be handled accordingly. I always have a load going unless we're having friends over or we're not at home. Enlist older kids for laundry duty as well. At my house, we try to categorize clothing, not only by color but by wearer. Maybe you've noticed that the putting away of clean clothes gets procrastinated longer  if the basket contains clothing worn by too many different people!

PARAGRAPH 7, ORIGINAL:

If you must take shortcuts, make them productive ones. Since we're discussing laundry… suppose you just cleaned and dried some but now you don't have time to fold it. A time-saving shortcut would be to at least carry the basket of clean clothing up to the person's room whose laundry it is. This way, in the morning if they're missing a favorite pair of jeans, you can direct them to the basket of clothes.

PARAGRAPH 7, EDITED:

Make your shortcuts productive ones. Since we're discussing laundry… suppose you just cleaned and dried some but now you don't have time to fold it. A time-saving shortcut would be to at least carry the basket of clean clothing up to the person's room whose laundry it is. This way, in the morning if they're missing a favorite pair of jeans, you can direct them to the basket of clothes. I also procrastinate with a purpose. I do my computing when the kids are at school. Then, I fold laundry in the same room with them while they watch afternoon TV.

PARAGRAPH 8, ORIGINAL:

Lay out kids' clothing the night before. If you're not sure what the weather will do, include two options such as shorts and pants. Lots of little ones prefer to dress themselves. This is fine, as long as your child is able to select a top and bottom that somewhat resembles what you would choose for them in terms of seasonal appropriateness and casual versus formal. For example, if today's occasion calls for a polo, then your child should understand that he or she can choose a different one -- but that a tee shirt may not be dressed-up enough.

PARAGRAPH 8, EDITED:

Lay out kids' clothing the night before. If, like me, you're sometimes not sure what the weather will do, include two options such as shorts and pants. Little ones often prefer to dress themselves. What I like to do is lay out a "sample" of what should be worn. For example, if today's occasion calls for a polo, I'll put one out but give my son the option of choosing a different color or pattern of polo.

PARAGRAPH 9, ORIGINAL - NO CHANGE.
Make and pack lunches at night. Sometimes the last thing you want to do is start filling lunch boxes at 8 p.m. But if you make lunch prep part of dinner clean-up, you can organize everything so that you're not awake at midnight worrying if you have enough cold cuts for everyone in the house to have lunch tomorrow.

PARAGRAPH 10, ORIGINAL - NO CHANGE.

Take shifts for the bathroom. If you're short on bathrooms, the best way around this is to stagger wake-up times. For a smaller sized family, adults can awaken, use the toilet and shower first. Kids follow suit while Mom or Dad is downstairs making breakfast. So set the alarms accordingly. Bigger families should allow for the kids with the earliest schedules to use the bathroom first. Also, things like hair drying and make-up application for teen girls needn't happen in the bathroom, especially when others are waiting their turn.

I have opted to keep paragraphs 9 and 10 in their original format because enough edits have been made to ensure this content reads like a blog post.

PARAGRAPH 11, ORIGINAL:

Schedule after-school activities, and stick to the plan. Even if your kids are smaller and they don't do extra-curriculars yet… afternoons should be planned for a bit of relaxation, a bit of play, homework hours, and time to review what's come home in the school folder. Missing this last step often results in a disorganized frenzy in the morning, with notes that need reading, permission slips and forms to sign, and general confusion.

PARAGRAPH 11, EDITED:

Keep extra-curriculars reasonable. Even if your kids are smaller and they don't do extra-curriculars yet… afternoons should be planned for a bit of relaxation, a bit of play, homework hours, and time to review what's come home in the school folder. When my kids were younger, I made the common mistake of overbooking extra curricular activities. This resulted in stressed-out kids, and a disorganized mom who wasn't keeping up with homework demands, forgetting to sign permission slips, and other avoidable mishaps.

FINAL PARAGRAPH, NO CHANGE:
Everyone knows that today's busy family has their share of challenges to keep up with, especially in the morning. But if you make that extra effort to be organized, you'll find that there are less tears and more smiles, which makes a great start to everyone's day.

I sincerely hope that after studying this before-and-after comparison, you now have a greater awareness of what makes an article an article versus what makes a blog post a blog post, and how you can easily edit the private label rights content that you purchase to make it more about your personal story.

 


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